CDH Info

8 12 2008

CDH Info

Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is a birth defect that occurs when the diaphragm does not fully form, allowing organs to enter the chest cavity preventing lung growth. CDH strikes 1 in every 2500 babies1, of all races, religious backgrounds, and financial status – no matter how well the prenatal care.

Nearly 4 million babies are born in the United States each year. This means that approximately 1600 babies are born with CDH each year – in the U.S. alone! There are more babies born with CDH than with Cystic Fibrosis (1 in 3900) and it’s almost as common as Spina Bifida (7 in 10,000) 2 – yet, you probably have never heard of it until it affected someone that you love. CHERUBS is working hard to raise Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Awareness!3

The cause of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia is not yet known.

50% of babies born with CDH do not survive and sometimes the remaining 50% have to overcome very difficult medical complications. Many CDH babies have minor lasting health problems such as feeding aversions, asthma, scoliosis, or short-term oxygen dependency. A small number have major lasting health problems such as ventilator dependency, brain damage, or hearing problems. Many patients have no long-lasting medical problems at all other than a scar from the CDH repair. CDH can occur alone or with other birth defects, and rarely, it occurs as part of a syndrome.

Every CDH baby is different, there is no way to predict the outcome of any patient. Some babies with no diaphragm and little lung growth have survived, while some babies with full lungs do not. These children are very different, requiring different treatments, and varying amounts of medical support.

Looking for support dealing with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia? Make sure to visit CHERUBS – The Association of Congenital DIaphragmatic Hernia Research, Awareness and Support

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